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Sharing new thoughts on aging.

Falls and Fractures

Ten Tips for Preventing Falls at Home

February 6, 2020

A simple fall for an older adult can land them in the hospital, and can lead to complications such as the need for hip surgery. As we get older, falls can become more common for a number of reasons, including the side effects of medications that may cause dizziness, a sudden drop in blood pressure, or even something overlooked like a scatter rug.

New Research to Prevent Falls

Examining the Use of Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation to Improve Mobility

January 3, 2020

Hookie Darack knows no limits.

The tennis-playing centenarian is the oldest subject in the tDCS and Steady Gait Study at Hebrew SeniorLife’s Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research. Her participation is proof that there’s no age when curiosity stops.

Hookie eagerly volunteered for the study, where investigators are seeking to reduce the risks of falls and promote safe, independent mobility for older adults through transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). This type of non-invasive brain stimulation holds promise as a novel intervention for improving walking, balance, and even cognition among older individuals. 

Alleviating the burden of balance decline with aging

September 24, 2019

Visit any retirement community, and you’ll hear one common fear among residents: falls. For many older people, a fall can lead to injury, decline, and a loss of independence. That’s why it’s an area of research focus at Hebrew SeniorLife’s Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research.

Brad Manor, Ph.D., is an associate scientist at the Marcus Institute. He’s investigating new treatments to alleviate the burden of balance decline that often accompanies biological aging, particularly among those with Parkinson’s disease.

How de-prescribing medication can benefit patients in a nursing home

August 15, 2019

People 65 years old and older take prescribed medications more frequently than any other age group in the United States. Medications can play a critical role in quality of life for older adults, but often times, prescribed medications can cause unintentional harm. Sarah Berry, M.D., M.P.H. is Associate Director, Musculoskeletal Research Center at Hebrew SeniorLife’s Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research, and an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School. She is studying risk and benefit factors for certain drug therapies among nursing home populations.

STEP-HI

March 26, 2019

STEP-HI

More than 265,000 older adults fracture a hip each year in the United States, with associated health-care costs estimated at more than $20 billion annually. About 20 percent of those die within a year, and more than 75 percent never recover their ability to function day to day. “A large proportion of fall deaths are due to complications following a hip fracture,” says the Center for Disease Control. “One in five hip fracture patients dies within a year of their injury.”

How Home Care Can Help Seniors Avoid Rehospitalization

January 4, 2018

Avoiding rehospitalization with home care

For patients returning home from a hospital stay, the last thing they or their families want is a return visit to the hospital or the emergency room.

At Hebrew SeniorLife Home Care, our goal is to keep seniors from returning to the hospital by providing the in-home medical treatment, therapy, and help with the essential activities they need to recover. Whether an individual is diagnosed with a new illness, recovering from surgery, or chronically or terminally ill, home health care services can be invaluable.

Sarcopenia: What is it, and who will it affect?

New study from the Institute for Aging Research finds hereditary link to muscle mass

September 25, 2017

The underlying cause of extreme loss of muscle mass could be hereditary

Every morning I wake up and stare inquisitively at myself in the mirror. And every morning, someone who looks alarmingly like my mother stares right back.

Now to be fair, I’ve always born a striking resemblance to my mom, though it seems to intensify with each passing day. She and I also share similar voices, similar handwriting, and the same inability to turn down anything made with chocolate.

And now, according to researchers at Hebrew SeniorLife’s Institute for Aging Research (IFAR) along with several other institutions, my mother and I will most likely share similar chances of developing sarcopenia in our later years.

Institute for Aging Research Director Discusses Fall Prevention in Video for Harvard Gazette

May 17, 2017

Image credit: Harvard Gazette

Scientists at the Institute for Aging Research are hard at work investigating effective, applicable methods to lower the risk of falls among older adults. In this video for the Harvard Gazette, IFAR Director Dr. Lew Lipsitz discusses the benefits of tai chi practice and electrical stimulation. Tai chi has become a popular activity among the residents of our senior living communities. Find out why. 

The Concerning New Trend in Osteoporosis Treatment

Too many are eschewing osteoporosis treatment and risking fatal injury

December 20, 2016

The Concerning New Trend in Osteoporosis Treatment

For thirty years, the incidence of hip fractures in older adults had been in decline. That is, until recently. Since 2012, that number has hit a plateau, which is very concerning to Dr. Douglas P. Kiel, Director of the Musculoskeletal Research Center at Hebrew SeniorLife’s Institute for Aging Research. According to Dr. Kiel, “By 2050, the worldwide incidence of hip fracture is projected to increase by 310% in men and 240% in women compared to rates in 1990.”

IFAR Researchers Investigate Potential New Therapy for Parkinson’s Disease

August 4, 2016

IFAR Researchers Investigate Potential New Therapy for Parkinson’s Disease

When Josephine Pina of Boston spotted an ad in the Metro newspaper seeking individuals who had difficulty with thinking and who moved slower than usual, she immediately contacted the staff at the Institute for Aging Research (IFAR) at Hebrew Senior Life. They were investigating the link between brain function, balance and falls in older adults. “I wanted to be part of the study and to see what the brain does at 67 years old,” she said.

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