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dementia

Celebrating Passover with Dementia

Use these tips to plan a dementia-friendly Passover or Easter celebration

April 8, 2014

Celebrating Passover with Dementia

The Easter and Passover holidays provide not only an opportunity to reconnect with our faith, but also a time to enjoy delicious meals and spend time with family and friends. For adults experiencing cognitive changes due to dementia, however, holidays can be stressful. Changes in routine are difficult for persons with dementia.  Care partners can become distracted by worrying about protecting their loved one’s everyday routines at events that are anything but routine. However, with thoughtful pre-planning and with the support of others, adults with dementia and their care partners can continue to find joy and meaning in the holidays. Here are some tips:

Preparing for the Holiday

Adult Day Care Activities

Adult day health programs improve quality of life for seniors

February 13, 2014

Adult Day Care Activities

At our adult day health programs, older adults socialize with their peers while participating in a wide variety of activities. And if nursing care is needed, it’s readily available.

Think of the alternatives. 

For many seniors it might be eight or more hours of isolation.  That’s because families have work and other commitments that force them to leave their loved one at home. A phone call every now and then doesn’t allow for much interaction. And what happens if the senior forgets to take his medications? Or leaves the stove on?

What is Advanced Dementia?

February 6, 2014

What is Advanced Dementia?

What is “Advanced Dementia”?

Although there are different causes for dementia, all types of dementia get worse over time. Advanced dementia refers to the final stage of the disease. The final stage comes at different times for everyone. On average, patients reach the advanced stage of dementia anywhere from 3-6 years after they are first diagnosed. The length of time people live with the advanced stage is also different for everyone and can range from months to years.

What are typical features of a patient with advanced dementia?

Traveling with Dementia

Taking a loved one with dementia on vacation

July 16, 2013

Traveling with Dementia

Summers in Massachusetts are wonderful. After months of ice and snow, the change in seasons finally allows us to enjoy long-awaited rituals. For many people, one of these is a summer vacation.

When you are caring for someone with dementia, the thought of a vacation may be wonderful, but the actual reality of the experience can be stressful and complicated. Caregiving is a 24/7 job wherever you are.  Dementia doesn’t go away like some of the other worries we leave at home while on vacation. In fact, the change in routine can make symptoms even worse. 

If you decide that travelling is important and that it brings value to you and your care partner’s life, the following suggestions may help make the process easier and safer for both of you:

5 Tips for Working Through a Parent’s Decreasing Independence

Coping with Alzheimer’s disease

March 19, 2013

aging parent

This blog is part of a year-long series aimed at addressing some of the most frequently asked questions we hear from family and adult children on the topics most concerning them regarding their aging parents or loved one. In 2012 Hebrew SeniorLife published the eBook "You & Your Aging Parent: A Family Approach to Lifelong Health, Wellness & Care," a compilation of answers from HSL geriatric experts in response to the many of the most frequently asked questions. We're reposting some of the most popular Q&A posts from our original eBook which was downloaded over 2,000 times. We're also adding new Q&As throughout the series that address topics not originally included in our eBook. Sign up to receive the blog series and download our original eBook at www.hslindependentliving.org

Dementia Conversation Tips

You and Your Aging Parents

March 5, 2013

Talking to loved ones about dementia

This blog is part of a year-long series aimed at addressing some of the most frequently asked questions we hear from family and adult children on the topics most concerning them regarding their aging parents or loved one. In 2012 Hebrew SeniorLife published the eBook "You & Your Aging Parent: A Family Approach to Lifelong Health, Wellness & Care," a compilation of answers from HSL geriatric experts in response to the many of the most frequently asked questions. We're reposting some of the most popular Q&A posts from our original eBook which was downloaded over 2,000 times. We're also adding new Q&As throughout the series that address topics not originally included in our eBook.

Does my parent have dementia?: Noticing memory problems in aging parents

You and Your Aging Parents

February 19, 2013

Ruth Kandel

This blog is part of a year-long series aimed at addressing some of the most frequently asked questions we hear from family and adult children on the topics most concerning them regarding their aging parents or loved one. In 2012 Hebrew SeniorLife published the eBook "You & Your Aging Parent: A Family Approach to Lifelong Health, Wellness & Care," a compilation of answers from HSL geriatric experts in response to the many of the most frequently asked questions. We're reposting some of the most popular Q&A posts from our original eBook which was downloaded over 2,000 times. We're also adding new Q&As throughout the series that address topics not originally included in our eBook.

What’s so Scary about Hearing Loss?

October 18, 2012

elderly man with doctor

What is so scary about hearing loss? Everyone gets a little hearing problem as they age, right? Well….yes. Most people do acquire age-related hearing loss, or presbycusis, as they get older. Untreated hearing loss, however, can be a scary thing! Its onset is usually slow and gets worse gradually, making it easy to ignore until much damage is already done.

Research out of Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, presents us with evidence of some frightening correlations between hearing loss and its subsequent effect on cognitive brain function.

ARTZ and Dementia: Innovation, Inclusion & Creative Expression Conference at Hebrew SeniorLife

September 25, 2012

patient and nurse

I find my work with older adults to be rewarding on so many levels. It is a privilege to be invited into an individual’s life and truly make a difference in how he or she experiences this important stage in the aging process. I  have worked in assisted living for more than 19 years and have experienced the power the arts has in giving a voice to seniors who struggle with cognitive decline. I’m thrilled to share an opportunity for professionals, to learn more about the role the arts can play in the lives of people living with dementia and to share their own stories.  We’ve designed an outstanding conference for eldercare professionals entitled: ARTZ and Dementia: Innovation, Inclusion & Creative Expression.

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