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Geriatric research

Delirium Prevention in Older Adults with the Hospital Elder Life Program

January 24, 2018

Everyone knows that a hospital visit can be stressful for even the healthiest person. But what you may not know, is that many patients - seniors especially - can be severely affected by the stress of a hospital visit or stay, and can often end up displaying signs of delirium. Delirium is a state of confusion that can develop following illness, infection or surgery, and is one of the most common complications in hospitalized patients over age 65.

Though delirium itself is temporary, it has serious long-term effects. The good news is, in many cases, there are relatively simple ways that hospital staff and family members can work together to prevent delirium.

New Clinical Trials Website Guides Aging Researchers, Improving Senior Health

IFAR researchers provide clinical trials expertise

September 25, 2017

Residents at one of HSL's senior living communities practice tai chi

The Institute for Aging Research (IFAR) is one of the few research institutions in the country translating clinical and health services research discoveries into interventions that improve the experience of aging.

“Most advances in medicine come from clinical trials,” says Susan Mitchell, M.D., M.P.H., senior scientist and director of Palliative Care Research at IFAR. “But many of the interventions that we are examining can be more complex than testing a pill,” she explains.

Sarcopenia: What is it, and who will it affect?

New study from the Institute for Aging Research finds hereditary link to muscle mass

September 25, 2017

The underlying cause of extreme loss of muscle mass could be hereditary

Every morning I wake up and stare inquisitively at myself in the mirror. And every morning, someone who looks alarmingly like my mother stares right back.

Now to be fair, I’ve always born a striking resemblance to my mom, though it seems to intensify with each passing day. She and I also share similar voices, similar handwriting, and the same inability to turn down anything made with chocolate.

And now, according to researchers at Hebrew SeniorLife’s Institute for Aging Research (IFAR) along with several other institutions, my mother and I will most likely share similar chances of developing sarcopenia in our later years.

Long-Term Chronic Care Hospital Medical Director Shares His Vision for Geriatric Care

An interview with Kent Bakaev, M.D., Medical Director of LTCH at Hebrew SeniorLife

September 20, 2017

An interview with Kent Bakaev, M.D., Medical Director of LTCH at Hebrew SeniorLife.

What inspired you to become a geriatrician?

A Person-Centered Approach to Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment: A Conversation with Geriatric Psychiatrist Dr. Gary Epstein-Lubow

We spoke with Dr. Epstein-Lubow about professional development, his vision for memory care treatment at HSL, and why person-centered care is the right approach to treat Alzheimer’s disease

September 19, 2017

Dr. Epstein-Lubow at Hebrew SeniorLife.

Tell us about your vision for the center of excellence for Alzheimer’s disease and memory care. Who will it serve and how?

Geriatrics Training Benefits Students and Residents at Hebrew SeniorLife

Medical students at Harvard partake in a day of geriatrics training with HSL staff, residents, and patients

September 8, 2017

Harvard Medical students meet with a Center Communities of Brookline resident in her apartment.

Institute for Aging Research Director Discusses Fall Prevention in Video for Harvard Gazette

May 17, 2017

Image credit: Harvard Gazette

Scientists at the Institute for Aging Research are hard at work investigating effective, applicable methods to lower the risk of falls among older adults. In this video for the Harvard Gazette, IFAR Director Dr. Lew Lipsitz discusses the benefits of tai chi practice and electrical stimulation. Tai chi has become a popular activity among the residents of our senior living communities. Find out why. 

5 Sources of Protein You Never Knew You Needed

April 12, 2017

Center Communities of Brookline residents at the Brookline Farmer's Market

Popeye, it seems, has been right all along. If you want to stay “strong to the finish,” you have to eat your spinach. Or at least some other types of protein-rich foods.

As we age, lean muscle mass begins to decline, but this trend can be significantly slowed with regular exercise and a generous amount of protein heavy meals. A recent study by Dr. Kelsey Mangano of Hebrew SeniorLife’s Institute for Aging Research has shown that older adults with considerably high protein intakes have more muscle mass and greater functional strength than those who consume less protein on average.

Age is just a number. It’s your DNA that counts.

Could DNA hold the secret to how we age?

March 22, 2017

Could DNA hold the secret to how we age?

My grandfather lived to be 96-years-old, surviving mostly on red wine and M&Ms. He started smoking a pipe before World War II, and probably never saw the inside of a gym. He outlived two wives and one girlfriend, and died peacefully in his bed—without ever succumbing to an injury, illness or disability.

Many of us have a relative like this—a legendary figure who defies all odds in the race against time. And on the flip side, almost all of us have firsthand knowledge of someone on the opposite end of the spectrum – who ate all the right foods, never smoked, and exercised daily— only to die young, sometimes seemingly out of the blue.

The Concerning New Trend in Osteoporosis Treatment

Too many are eschewing osteoporosis treatment and risking fatal injury

December 20, 2016

The Concerning New Trend in Osteoporosis Treatment

For thirty years, the incidence of hip fractures in older adults had been in decline. That is, until recently. Since 2012, that number has hit a plateau, which is very concerning to Dr. Douglas P. Kiel, Director of the Musculoskeletal Research Center at Hebrew SeniorLife’s Institute for Aging Research. According to Dr. Kiel, “By 2050, the worldwide incidence of hip fracture is projected to increase by 310% in men and 240% in women compared to rates in 1990.”

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