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Sharing new thoughts on aging.

Finding Social Outlets in Senior Living

The Orchard Cove Coffee Klatch

April 22, 2015

Finding Social Outlets in Senior Living

When new residents arrive at Orchard Cove, members of the Coffee Klatch typically appear at their doorstep as a welcome wagon into the community. The Coffee Klatch is known to residents of Orchard Cove as the place to meet new faces and make new friends. For club members, it’s more than just a cup of coffee and a chance to catch up. The club exemplifies the efforts of residents and staff to maintain a sense of community and makes Orchard Cove a welcoming place for all.

The Next 50 Years in Aging Research

Looking ahead with IFAR Director Dr. Lew Lipsitz

April 16, 2015

The Next 50 Years in Aging Research

Before we look ahead, I think it’s important to see where things began for aging research at Hebrew SeniorLife. Since 1965 the Institute for Aging Research (IFAR) has been at the forefront of geriatric research to improve the quality of life for seniors. IFAR research has contributed to some of the most important innovations in senior care:

Memory Care Living: Redefining “Living Space”

April 8, 2015

Memory Care Living: Redefining “Living Space”

This blog is part of a year-long series aimed at addressing some of the most frequently asked questions we hear from family and adult children on the topics most concerning them regarding their aging parents or loved one. In 2012 Hebrew SeniorLife published the eBook "You & Your Aging Parent: A Family Approach to Lifelong Health, Wellness & Care," a compilation of answers from HSL geriatric experts in response to the many of the most frequently asked questions. We're reposting some of the most popular Q&A posts from our original eBook which was downloaded over 2,000 times.

Living with Dementia: Buyer beware when it comes to preventative “Brain Games”

April 2, 2015

Living with Dementia: Buyer beware when it comes to preventative “Brain Games”

There is a growing interest in cognitive training as a means to help maintain cognition in healthy adults, and perhaps slow the progression of dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease in those at risk. Given that a cure for Alzheimer’s appears years away, and with the record number of adults reaching age 65 each day, there is no surprise that that the growth of the cognitive training industry over the last decade is in the billions of dollars.